Assistant (to the) Teacher

In a spate of blog-updating energy, I gave a quick update and then talked about a Conversation Partners class I got to teach earlier this year.

Next on my list is my new role as an Assistant Teacher.

How I Got There

I thought I wasn’t going to be able to teach this semester. My family moved such that commuting to the place(s) where I used to teach became nightmarish. I’m just not cut out for a drive of less than 15 miles taking 50+ minutes. I guess one of the benefits of being an adjunct with no possibility of benefits is that I’m at least not tethered with golden chains to a specific brutal commute. I applied to programs closer to our new home and discovered another group of lovely people running a great program, and I was very pleased to be welcomed onto their roster of teachers. The problem was that their courses all meet twice a week.

I actually prefer the twice-a-week model to the once-a-week model in terms of learning retention, assignment pacing, class camaraderie, etc. The problem was that in order to prep my once-a-week class I was already tiptoeing around the home office before sunrise to get my planning in. Planning twice as many sessions was going to push me into the zone of “I’m Probably Overextended But I’m Doing My Best Given The Circumstances” for both my teaching and my momming (I am in charge of the kids during the day). This is an uncomfortable zone to be in, and in my own experience comes with a frenetic pace and lots of crankiness. The cost-benefit analysis was pretty clear: it didn’t make sense to teach this semester. When the kids are older, when they (and I) sleep better, when they can be expected to play on their own for a reasonable amount of time, then would be the time I could take on a twice-a-week class and give it my actual best.

Then I got an email from the department asking if I’d like to assistant teach this semester. Half the in-class time commitment and none of the prep. That sounds like about what I can handle right now – yes please!

The Experience

So I go in for about an hour twice a week. The location is really quite convenient to my  home – hooray! The teacher is kind and welcoming, and I enjoy brainstorming with her and working with the students.

This is actually my first time assistant teaching  and it’s a hugely valuable experience to be in an ESL classroom throughout the whole semester but not be The Leader. I can bring a much more low-key energy, focus on different things and different people, and see the classroom from a not-the-teacher perspective. Really, it’s like a semester-long professional development activity that I’m getting compensated for.

One source of irony is that this experience, like other great PD, is a huge idea generator. But as the assistant, I really don’t have a say in how the class goes (though the teacher is super collaborative and asks for and values my opinions). I’m taking detailed notes on specifics so I can apply some or all of these ideas to my next class. In the meantime, I’m doing my best to stay in the moment and not get carried away with the possibilities. Having the space to wind down and be is a huge benefit of being “just” the assistant.

I wouldn’t want to forego actual teaching, leading, and preparation for any length of time – I value it and I already miss it. But I’m just so pleased at how things worked out this semester: I’m involved, I’m not overextended, and I’m growing as a teacher.

You’re reading Assistant (to the) Teacher, originally posted at LearningToTeachEnglish.com.

 

 

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